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Welcome to Georgetown University’s Teaching, Learning & Innovation Summer Institute, hosted by the Center for New Designs in Learning and Scholarship.

TLISI offers Georgetown University faculty and staff from all campuses the opportunity to explore strategies for excellence in teaching and learning. This year’s Institute will focus on several topic areas, including effective teaching and learning practices, inclusive pedagogies, technology-enhanced learning, Ignatian pedagogy, cross-institutional and cross-departmental collaborations, and more.

We hope you’ll join us in our efforts to make TLISI "green"! We’re partnering with the Office of Sustainability to reduce the environmental impact from this year’s Institute by providing compostable materials and expanding our recycling presence.  Each registrant will also receive a free aluminum water bottle upon picking up your name badge at registration.  You can help us Go Green by bringing your reusable water bottle back with you each day, as we will be limiting our supply of single-use plastics throughout the week.  Stop by our information table anytime Monday-Thursday to learn about ways that you can help your office Go Green!

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Monday, May 20
 

9:00am

TEL Colloquium - For Current TEL Colloquium Members Only
For TEL Colloquium members only.

Featuring the following guest speakers:
  • Dr. Yumi Jarris, Family Medicine (2018 CNDLS TEL Colloquium cohort member)
  • Dr. Bassem Haddad, Oncology (2018 CNDLS TEL Colloquium cohort member)
  • Dr. Sarah Stiles, Sociology (2018 CNDLS TEL Colloquium cohort member)

Speakers
ES

Eleri Syverson

Jr Instructional Designer, Center for New Designs in Learning and Scholarship
avatar for Kylie McGraw

Kylie McGraw

Online Course Coordinator, CNDLS


Monday May 20, 2019 9:00am - 11:45am
Lauinger Library - Murray Room

9:00am

Open Registration & Name Badge Pick-Up - 9:00 - 3:00pm
Swing by the registration table in the Great Room to pick up your name badges or submit your last-minute registration for TLISI.

Monday May 20, 2019 9:00am - 3:00pm
Great Room

9:30am

9:30am

11:30am

(In-Person Attendance) - Lunch Plenary - How Learning Works
Dr. Susan Ambrose, Professor of Education and History, is Senior Vice Provost for Educational Innovation at Northeastern University.

In this session, we will consider how seven, research-based principles of learning impact participants’ work as they engage with students in a variety of ways through their respective roles.

An internationally-recognized expert in college-level teaching and learning, Dr. Ambrose has conducted workshops and seminars for faculty and administrators throughout the United States and around the world. She focuses on translating research to practice in the design of curricula, courses and educational experiences for both undergraduate and graduate students.

Dr. Ambrose earned her Doctorate of Arts in history from Carnegie Mellon University, and served as Associate Provost for Education, Director of the Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence, and a Teaching Professor in the Department of History at Carnegie Mellon before joining Northeastern in August 2012.

Lunch will begin at 11:30am, with TLISI opening remarks beginning at 12:00pm.

Speakers

Monday May 20, 2019 11:30am - 1:45pm
Great Room

11:30am

(Livestream Attendance) - Lunch Plenary - How Learning Works
Dr. Susan Ambrose, Professor of Education and History, is Senior Vice Provost for Educational Innovation at Northeastern University.

In this session, we will consider how seven, research-based principles of learning impact participants’ work as they engage with students in a variety of ways through their respective roles.

An internationally-recognized expert in college-level teaching and learning, Dr. Ambrose has conducted workshops and seminars for faculty and administrators throughout the United States and around the world. She focuses on translating research to practice in the design of curricula, courses and educational experiences for both undergraduate and graduate students.

Dr. Ambrose earned her Doctorate of Arts in history from Carnegie Mellon University, and served as Associate Provost for Education, Director of the Eberly Center for Teaching Excellence, and a Teaching Professor in the Department of History at Carnegie Mellon before joining Northeastern in August 2012.

Lunch will begin at 11:30am, with TLISI opening remarks beginning at 12:00pm.

Speakers

Monday May 20, 2019 11:30am - 1:45pm
Zoom

2:00pm

(In-Person Attendance) - Integrating Writing in the Major
Georgetown’s Integrated Writing requirement was implemented as part of the Core Curriculum in 2014. The IW requirement invited faculty in every field to articulate what their students should learn about writing and to specify how their programs help students develop as writers. Programs responded in a variety of ways, from adding brief notes to their websites describing their existing ideas about and approaches to writing to developing whole new courses or resources. Five years in, now is a good time to review and reflect on how the requirement is working for both faculty and students.

In this session, faculty who have helped to implement IW in their programs will reflect on what the requirement has meant for their students and their programs, including opportunities, challenges, and obstacles. How has adding writing to the goals for the major affected faculty work and students’ experiences? What practices or conditions on campus or within their programs have helped? What difficulties have they encountered?


Monday May 20, 2019 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Herman Room

2:00pm

(Livestream Attendance) - Integrating Writing in the Major
Georgetown’s Integrated Writing requirement was implemented as part of the Core Curriculum in 2014. The IW requirement invited faculty in every field to articulate what their students should learn about writing and to specify how their programs help students develop as writers. Programs responded in a variety of ways, from adding brief notes to their websites describing their existing ideas about and approaches to writing to developing whole new courses or resources. Five years in, now is a good time to review and reflect on how the requirement is working for both faculty and students.

In this session, faculty who have helped to implement IW in their programs will reflect on what the requirement has meant for their students and their programs, including opportunities, challenges, and obstacles. How has adding writing to the goals for the major affected faculty work and students’ experiences? What practices or conditions on campus or within their programs have helped? What difficulties have they encountered?


Monday May 20, 2019 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Herman Room

2:00pm

(In-Person Attendance) - Addressing the Imposter Syndrome at Georgetown
Imposter Syndrome, described as the persistent internal fear of being exposed as a fraud, can effect us all at various times in our academic and professional lives. Georgetown University attracts the best and brightest, but with that collection of genius, doubt and insecurity about how we measure up can creep into our conscious impacting career and academic pursuits. Join us in the experiential workshop to build a toolbox that will help ourselves, students, and the community as a whole strengthen our sense of self worth by staying grounded in personal values, skills, and interests as we pursue research, job, and career opportunities.

Speakers
RB

Rebecca Bonco

Associate Director, SFS Grad Career Center


Monday May 20, 2019 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Film Screening Room

2:00pm

(Livestream Attendance) - Addressing the Imposter Syndrome at Georgetown
Imposter Syndrome, described as the persistent internal fear of being exposed as a fraud, can effect us all at various times in our academic and professional lives. Georgetown University attracts the best and brightest, but with that collection of genius, doubt and insecurity about how we measure up can creep into our conscious impacting career and academic pursuits. Join us in the experiential workshop to build a toolbox that will help ourselves, students, and the community as a whole strengthen our sense of self worth by staying grounded in personal values, skills, and interests as we pursue research, job, and career opportunities.

Speakers
RB

Rebecca Bonco

Associate Director, SFS Grad Career Center


Monday May 20, 2019 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Zoom

2:00pm

Social Justice Theater: Everyday Bias at Georgetown
This role play demonstration and interactive exercise will demonstrate how bias unchecked can seep into everything from job searches, interviews, promotion considerations, and team interactions. Given the recent rise in attention and interest around unconscious bias research over the past few years, this workshop explores the topic of unconscious bias and how to mitigate its consequences in the workplace both at an individual and group level. The workshop will challenge how unchecked bias can lead to easy shortcuts of evaluating candidates by how well they "fit" in with the group or only by how one feels about the candidate by "going with their gut."


Monday May 20, 2019 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Social Room

2:00pm

Leveraging VR and Immersive Technology for Enriching the Classroom Experience
Technology and its use has been pervasive and taken for granted in most aspects of our lives. In light of that, it is surprising that it is mostly absent from the classroom. Although there are great technological advancements that could be relevant for teaching, most teachers do not leverage technology to enhance their teaching and classroom learning.
In this session we will explore the innovative classroom use of VR and immersive technology by GU faculty. Some specific topics that we will address include:
• Virtual Reality (VR) as it is used to enhance student learning in
Georgetown
• Professors’ and students’ experiences
• Technology as a gimmick vs. a true pedagogical tool
• The state of the art and additional innovative teaching practices using
VR and immersive technologies
• Resources available at GU and their limitations

Confirmed participants in this roundtable discussion include the following faculty and staff: Alona Bachi (School of Foreign Service), Barrinton Baynes (Gelardin New Media Ctr), Laura Bishop (KIE), Patrick Johnson (Physics), John Trybus (Cause Consulting), and Sarah Johnson (Environmental Geoscience).

Intended audience: GU faculty and technology staff

Outcomes:
• Sharing knowledge and resources employed by GU faculty
• Discussing the contribution of immersive technology to increase
efficacy of teaching and learning
• Increasing awareness of GU faculty to available technological
resources and provide ideas for technology-enhanced learning.
• Examining options for increasing availability of and access to
immersive technology and resources at GU.

Speakers
avatar for Barrinton Baynes

Barrinton Baynes

Multimedia Project Manager, Gelardin New Media Center
avatar for Patrick Johnson

Patrick Johnson

Assistant Teaching Professor
JT

John Trybus

Managing Director & Adjunct Professor
LB

Laura Bishop

Assoc Teaching Professor & Academic Prog Manager, Kennedy Institute of Ethics
bioethics


Monday May 20, 2019 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Lauinger Library - Idea Lab (1st Floor)

2:00pm

TEL Colloquium - For Current TEL Colloquium Members Only
For TEL Colloquium members only.

Featuring the following guest speakers:
  • Dr. Yumi Jarris, Family Medicine (2018 CNDLS TEL Colloquium cohort member)
  • Dr. Bassem Haddad, Oncology (2018 CNDLS TEL Colloquium cohort member)
  • Dr. Sarah Stiles, Sociology (2018 CNDLS TEL Colloquium cohort member)

Speakers
ES

Eleri Syverson

Jr Instructional Designer, Center for New Designs in Learning and Scholarship
avatar for Kylie McGraw

Kylie McGraw

Online Course Coordinator, CNDLS


Monday May 20, 2019 2:00pm - 4:10pm
Lauinger Library - Murray Room

3:10pm

Teaching to Mission Roundtable
This roundtable discussion will explore what it means to teach at Georgetown, a Jesuit university, for people from all faith backgrounds. Jesuit education, Ignatian pedagogy, and the Spirit of Georgetown provide us with many values and phrases that can be useful in designing our courses and interacting with students. But what are the many forms that "engaging the whole student", "forming men and women for others", or contemplation, reflection, and discernment take in designing learning experiences? Join two of the facilitators of the Teaching to Mission Engelhard Faculty Conversation Series in engaging this question, sharing your own experiences and practices, and learning together about how the mission of Georgetown influences and shapes our common purpose.

Speakers

Monday May 20, 2019 3:10pm - 4:10pm
Film Screening Room

3:10pm

(In-Person Attendance) - Topics in Inclusive Pedagogy: Climate and Power in the Classroom
How does power shape classroom climate, student engagement, and learning outcomes? This session takes a close look at the various types of power faculty and students might have, and considers strategies for mitigating the effects of power imbalances. Through a discussion of the pitfalls of unexamined power, we’ll work to identify tools that foster a sense of empowerment for students and faculty in the learning environment. Areas of focus will include assessment, classroom participation, and mentorship. This session will be most relevant to faculty, but will also have relevance for staff whose work puts them in regular contact with students.

Speakers
MO

Michelle Ohnona

Program Manager for Diversity Initiatives


Monday May 20, 2019 3:10pm - 4:10pm
Social Room

3:10pm

(Livestream Attendance) - Topics in Inclusive Pedagogy: Climate and Power in the Classroom
How does power shape classroom climate, student engagement, and learning outcomes? This session takes a close look at the various types of power faculty and students might have, and considers strategies for mitigating the effects of power imbalances. Through a discussion of the pitfalls of unexamined power, we’ll work to identify tools that foster a sense of empowerment for students and faculty in the learning environment. Areas of focus will include assessment, classroom participation, and mentorship. This session will be most relevant to faculty, but will also have relevance for staff whose work puts them in regular contact with students.

Speakers
MO

Michelle Ohnona

Program Manager for Diversity Initiatives


Monday May 20, 2019 3:10pm - 4:10pm
Zoom

3:10pm

(In-Person Attendance) - Utilizing Data to Empower Creative Teaching and Learning Strategies - Rethinking Qualtrics as Not “Just” a Survey Tool
“Data isn't just the big test, it's all the little things that can inform your instructional decisions”. In this session, we’ll introduce a Georgetown integrated survey and research tool, Qualtrics. You will learn how Qualtrics can enable faculty to design teaching strategies for assessment, interactive learning, and course layout and design. Qualtrics can also be used to collect data and auto-generate visualizations on student performance. Participants will have the opportunity to view examples of Qualtrics in each of these capacities. A hands-on workshop will guide participants in learning the basic features and functions of Qualtrics, so please bring a laptop!

Speakers
avatar for Zhuqing Ding

Zhuqing Ding

Project Coordinator, Georgetown University
avatar for Sarah Chamberlain

Sarah Chamberlain

Graduate Associate, The Center for New Designs in Learning and Scholarship


Monday May 20, 2019 3:10pm - 4:10pm
Herman Room

3:10pm

(Livestream Attendance) - Utilizing Data to Empower Creative Teaching and Learning Strategies - Rethinking Qualtrics as Not “Just” a Survey Tool
“Data isn't just the big test, it's all the little things that can inform your instructional decisions”. In this session, we’ll introduce a Georgetown integrated survey and research tool, Qualtrics. You will learn how Qualtrics can enable faculty to design teaching strategies for assessment, interactive learning, and course layout and design. Qualtrics can also be used to collect data and auto-generate visualizations on student performance. Participants will have the opportunity to view examples of Qualtrics in each of these capacities. A hands-on workshop will guide participants in learning the basic features and functions of Qualtrics, so please bring a laptop!

Speakers
avatar for Zhuqing Ding

Zhuqing Ding

Project Coordinator, Georgetown University
avatar for Sarah Chamberlain

Sarah Chamberlain

Graduate Associate, The Center for New Designs in Learning and Scholarship


Monday May 20, 2019 3:10pm - 4:10pm
Zoom

4:15pm

Tech Exploration Social Hour
Stop by for a bite to eat, drinks, and an opportunity to socialize while exploring technology-related topics for teaching and learning. CNDLS staff and students will be present to help you think about potential use-cases for tools you can use for blended learning, lecture-capture, project-based learning, analytics, creative assessment, and more.

We will also be featuring posters from campus colleagues, including:

  • “Memory, Diversity, Empathy” - Erika Seamon
  • “Teach-the-Visit: German Department "Teach-In" on Martin Luther King Jr's visit to divided Berlin, 1964” - Astrid Weigert, Andrea Dawn Bryant
  • “Developing Fully Online First Year Language Courses” - Fulvia Musti, Peter Janssens, Donatella Melucci
  • "Arabic Teaching with Technology" - Hany Fazza and Gautam Saha

Speakers
avatar for Ann Wang

Ann Wang

Online Course Coordinator, CNDLS
avatar for Zhuqing Ding

Zhuqing Ding

Project Coordinator, Georgetown University
KJ

Kevin Jang

Full Stack Developer, CNDLS at Georgetown University
avatar for Astrid Weigert

Astrid Weigert

Teaching Professor, Dept of German
Full-time non-tenure line issues at GUlanguage teaching, business culture in foreign language coursesTeaching to Mission
FM

Fulvia Musti

Assistant Teaching Professor, Georgetown University
avatar for Gautam Saha

Gautam Saha

Manager of Educational Technology and Instructional Design, Georgetown University Qatar
Gautam Saha is the Manager of Educational Technology and Instructional Design at Georgetown University in Qatar. He holds graduate degrees in Chemistry and Instructional Technology. He also holds professional certifications in Learning Management System and Customer Relationship Management... Read More →


Monday May 20, 2019 4:15pm - 5:30pm
Great Room

5:00pm

(Livestream Attendance) - Getting Started and Building Your Course in Canvas
New to Canvas, moving from Blackboard, or need a refresher? This online session provides an overview of the Canvas interface and core functionality.

Topics covered:

- Login and manage your Canvas course Dashboard
- Add files, create pages and organize course material using modules
- Create assignments and quizzes, and grade using Speedgrader
- Communicate with students using the Canvas Inbox and course announcement tools


Monday May 20, 2019 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Zoom

5:30pm

(In-Person Attendance) - Faculty and Staff Publishing
For both faculty and staff: An article in the right journal can change careers, but few teaching professionals have enough time to stop and devote themselves to research and writing. This session gives you strategies to consistently publish in the best journals in your field in less than half the time, even during a teaching semester. But wait! What if you're staff? Can you still publish prestigiously? Absolutely, and we'll discuss how Georgetown staff members can be part of this exciting conversation. Audience survey responses before the session will help tailor it to specific needs.

Speakers
avatar for Carole Sargent

Carole Sargent

Director, Office of Scholarly Publications, Georgetown University


Monday May 20, 2019 5:30pm - 6:30pm
Herman Room

5:30pm

(Livestream Attendance) - Faculty and Staff Publishing
For both faculty and staff: An article in the right journal can change careers, but few teaching professionals have enough time to stop and devote themselves to research and writing. This session gives you strategies to consistently publish in the best journals in your field in less than half the time, even during a teaching semester. But wait! What if you're staff? Can you still publish prestigiously? Absolutely, and we'll discuss how Georgetown staff members can be part of this exciting conversation. Audience survey responses before the session will help tailor it to specific needs.

Speakers
avatar for Carole Sargent

Carole Sargent

Director, Office of Scholarly Publications, Georgetown University


Monday May 20, 2019 5:30pm - 6:30pm
Zoom
 
Tuesday, May 21
 

8:30am

Silent Group Meditation
Join the John Main Center for 30-minutes of quiet reflection and meditation.  

Tuesday May 21, 2019 8:30am - 9:00am
John Main Center

9:00am

Breakfast (Open to All)
Tuesday May 21, 2019 9:00am - 9:45am
Great Room

9:00am

Open Registration & Name Badge Pick-Up - 9:00 - 3:00pm
Swing by the registration table in the Great Room to pick up your name badges or submit your last-minute registration for TLISI.

Tuesday May 21, 2019 9:00am - 3:00pm
Great Room

9:15am

Building Writing into Your Course: Why and How
Writing is one of the best ways to help students understand the key ideas of your course, no matter what you teach. It’s also the best evidence of how well students can use those ideas. But to make it work well – for students and for faculty – we need to make strategic choices about how to use writing to foster engagement and how to design assignments that generate meaningful learning and papers we want to read. This hands-on workshop will help you design courses and assignments that cultivate better learning and better writing.


Tuesday May 21, 2019 9:15am - 10:45am
Film Screening Room

9:30am

9:30am

9:45am

(In-Person Attendance) - So I Have Bias. Now What?
The research around unconscious bias is pretty clear: bias is the normal, natural result of the workings of the human mind. We all have it. There are even benefits. But it also leads to clear injustices and can hamper our ability to teach and support all of our students equally well. In this workshop, we'll explore different student-centered contexts and various interventions for mitigating the impacts of our bias as we seek to support our students in these contexts.


Tuesday May 21, 2019 9:45am - 10:45am
Social Room

9:45am

(LivestreamAttendance) - So I Have Bias. Now What?
The research around unconscious bias is pretty clear: bias is the normal, natural result of the workings of the human mind. We all have it. There are even benefits. But it also leads to clear injustices and can hamper our ability to teach and support all of our students equally well. In this workshop, we'll explore different student-centered contexts and various interventions for mitigating the impacts of our bias as we seek to support our students in these contexts.


Tuesday May 21, 2019 9:45am - 10:45am
Zoom

9:45am

(In-Person Attendance) - Creating Spaces to Lead with the Heart
Learning and integrating a mindful practice has become central to our way of life in education, work and home lives. Having presence as a leader, or being the “lead energy”, means going beyond the feelings of stress in our personal and professional lives, to being more present with an open heart. Learning compassion mindful-based practices can help lead us to sustainable engagement in how we live, work and learn. How we can change an environment so we encourage learning from each other? Whether it is imagery to help with envisioning, compassion-based action, or self-awareness, mindfulness has the capacity to create these heart-led shared spaces. There are different ways that mind and body connect so we can work and learn with more energized intent to mentor creative innovative solutions. Mindfulness, compassion, breath and movement (or embodied practice) all help to promote attention and learning. Charles DeSantis, Chief Benefits and Wellness Officer for Georgetown University, has long incorporated mindfulness practice and presence in his programming and leadership approach. From wellness breaks to Ignatian discernment to mindfulness practices, Charles has been an advocate and example of creating space for thriving at home and work. In addition, Charles' work with refugee and orphan populations has informed his thinking and being as a healing and heart-led presence at Georgetown University. Faculty and staff will experience the mindful embodied practice of Qigong and its practical application for leading in the classroom, work space and at home. While Qigong is has been called moving meditation and is a gentle form of movement, it also involves still meditation. It has been known to help enhance health with physical, mental, spiritual benefits. No previous experience is necessary and the movement portion can be adapted to any level and done seated. Ann Duvall has been teaching Qigong and wellness at Georgetown for Faculty and Staff Benefits for several years. To learn more about her go to annduvall.com.


Tuesday May 21, 2019 9:45am - 10:45am
Herman Room

9:45am

(Livestream Attendance) - Creating Spaces to Lead with the Heart
Learning and integrating a mindful practice has become central to our way of life in education, work and home lives. Having presence as a leader, or being the “lead energy”, means going beyond the feelings of stress in our personal and professional lives, to being more present with an open heart. Learning compassion mindful-based practices can help lead us to sustainable engagement in how we live, work and learn. How we can change an environment so we encourage learning from each other? Whether it is imagery to help with envisioning, compassion-based action, or self-awareness, mindfulness has the capacity to create these heart-led shared spaces. There are different ways that mind and body connect so we can work and learn with more energized intent to mentor creative innovative solutions. Mindfulness, compassion, breath and movement (or embodied practice) all help to promote attention and learning. Charles DeSantis, Chief Benefits and Wellness Officer for Georgetown University, has long incorporated mindfulness practice and presence in his programming and leadership approach. From wellness breaks to Ignatian discernment to mindfulness practices, Charles has been an advocate and example of creating space for thriving at home and work. In addition, Charles' work with refugee and orphan populations has informed his thinking and being as a healing and heart-led presence at Georgetown University. Faculty and staff will experience the mindful embodied practice of Qigong and its practical application for leading in the classroom, work space and at home. While Qigong is has been called moving meditation and is a gentle form of movement, it also involves still meditation. It has been known to help enhance health with physical, mental, spiritual benefits. No previous experience is necessary and the movement portion can be adapted to any level and done seated. Ann Duvall has been teaching Qigong and wellness at Georgetown for Faculty and Staff Benefits for several years. To learn more about her go to annduvall.com.


Tuesday May 21, 2019 9:45am - 10:45am
Zoom

9:45am

Escape Room - Sign-Up In-Person Outside G313!
Limited Capacity full

Even though this session says "Full" on Sched, there may still be spaces available for the Escape Room; however, you can only sign-up for the Escape Room via the paper sign-up sheet outside of G313 in the Healey Family Student Center!

Sign-up each day outside of HFSC Room G313 (directly next to the main HFSC entrance) for an exciting Escape Room designed by members of the CNDLS media team!  Limited slots are available.  

Tuesday May 21, 2019 9:45am - 11:55am
G313

10:55am

The Future of Georgetown's Classroom Design
This listening session is hosted by representatives from the Office of the University Registrar, CETS, and CNDLS to discuss faculty ideas about future of Georgetown's classrooms with specific focus on modernizing learning spaces to accommodate a wide range of teaching methods, including both collaborative and lecture-based techniques. Attending faculty are encouraged to be prepared to discuss how they envision classroom space and technology that can support their specific teaching methods, help make students more active participants in the learning process, and support contemporary pedagogies.


Tuesday May 21, 2019 10:55am - 11:55am
Herman Room

10:55am

(In-Person Attendance) - Ungrading: Should We Stop Grading Papers?
In a provocative post on his blog last spring, Jesse Stommel suggested a simple but profound change in faculty behavior: “If you're a teacher and you hate grading, stop doing it.” Stommel’s challenge is just one salvo in a national discussion about whether assigning letter grades helps students learn. At the heart of the conversation are questions about what grades measure, how they affect student motivation, and the seemingly radical idea that grades can actually get in the way of learning.

This spring, we decided to test these ideas by designing first-year writing courses in which we would provide students with plenty of feedback on their writing but no letter grades on their assignments. In this report, we’ll explain why we decided to try ungrading, describe what we did, and offer our reflections and share comments from our students about how it affected us and our students. Does “ungrading” make a difference in student learning? In faculty experience? And how does it work for a required course aimed at first-year students?

Speakers

Tuesday May 21, 2019 10:55am - 11:55am
Film Screening Room

10:55am

(Livestream Attendance) - Ungrading: Should We Stop Grading Papers?
In a provocative post on his blog last spring, Jesse Stommel suggested a simple but profound change in faculty behavior: “If you're a teacher and you hate grading, stop doing it.” Stommel’s challenge is just one salvo in a national discussion about whether assigning letter grades helps students learn. At the heart of the conversation are questions about what grades measure, how they affect student motivation, and the seemingly radical idea that grades can actually get in the way of learning.

This spring, we decided to test these ideas by designing first-year writing courses in which we would provide students with plenty of feedback on their writing but no letter grades on their assignments. In this report, we’ll explain why we decided to try ungrading, describe what we did, and offer our reflections and share comments from our students about how it affected us and our students. Does “ungrading” make a difference in student learning? In faculty experience? And how does it work for a required course aimed at first-year students?

Speakers

Tuesday May 21, 2019 10:55am - 11:55am
Zoom

10:55am

(In-Person Attendance) - Topics in Inclusive Pedagogy: Opportunities for Inclusive Content and Pedagogical Practice

At its core, inclusive pedagogy is aimed at creating a space for learning that works for all students, and to allow every student to have equal access to learning in the class. In order to do so, deliberate actions must be taken to foster such access to learning and build a sense of belonging for each student, especially students with historically excluded identities. Building an environment of inclusivity into a course can take on a number of strategies; in this workshop, we will focus interrogating and varying the content and pedagogy of a course toward greater inclusion and engagement of diverse students. We will hear from individual professors who have incorporated inclusive pedagogy and content into their courses. Then, through facilitated reflection and discussion, participants will have the opportunity to explore the pedagogy and content within their own course(s), and work alongside others to begin to identity and activate ways in which they can redesign their course(s) toward fostering more equitable and inclusive learning environments for their students. We ask that all workshop attendees have a course in mind that they would be interested in evaluating and possibly redesigning. Having a copy of the current syllabus would also be useful.


Tuesday May 21, 2019 10:55am - 11:55am
Social Room

10:55am

(Livestream Attendance) - Topics in Inclusive Pedagogy: Opportunities for Inclusive Content and Pedagogical Practice

At its core, inclusive pedagogy is aimed at creating a space for learning that works for all students, and to allow every student to have equal access to learning in the class. In order to do so, deliberate actions must be taken to foster such access to learning and build a sense of belonging for each student, especially students with historically excluded identities. Building an environment of inclusivity into a course can take on a number of strategies; in this workshop, we will focus interrogating and varying the content and pedagogy of a course toward greater inclusion and engagement of diverse students. We will hear from individual professors who have incorporated inclusive pedagogy and content into their courses. Then, through facilitated reflection and discussion, participants will have the opportunity to explore the pedagogy and content within their own course(s), and work alongside others to begin to identity and activate ways in which they can redesign their course(s) toward fostering more equitable and inclusive learning environments for their students. We ask that all workshop attendees have a course in mind that they would be interested in evaluating and possibly redesigning. Having a copy of the current syllabus would also be useful.


Tuesday May 21, 2019 10:55am - 11:55am
Zoom

12:00pm

(In-Person Attendance) - Lunch Plenary- Teaching and Learning Behind Bars
Marc M. Howard is Professor of Government and Law, and the founding Director of the Prisons and Justice Initiative, at Georgetown University. He is one of the country's leading voices and advocates for criminal justice and prison reform. His academic research addresses the deep challenges of contemporary democracy and the tragedy of criminal justice and prisons in America.

The author of three books and dozens of scholarly articles, his work has received numerous awards, including from the American Political Science Association and the International Studies Association. His most recent book is Unusually Cruel: Prisons, Punishment, and the Real American Exceptionalism. He is also a prize-winning teacher, and his "Prisons and Punishment" course has become one of the most sought-after courses at Georgetown.

This session will explore the many reasons for providing education to incarcerated people. It will highlight the tremendous benefits for incarcerated students themselves--who develop a stronger sense of self, critical reasoning skills, and debate as a tool for conflict resolution--as well as for carceral facilities, which run more smoothly and peacefully when their residents are engaged and motivated. It will provide examples from the new Georgetown Prison Scholars Program at the DC Jail, which now offers two credit-bearing courses per semester, along with a host of non-credit courses.


Tuesday May 21, 2019 12:00pm - 1:45pm
Great Room

12:00pm

(Livestream Attendance) - Lunch Plenary - Teaching and Learning Behind Bars
Marc M. Howard is Professor of Government and Law, and the founding Director of the Prisons and Justice Initiative, at Georgetown University. He is one of the country's leading voices and advocates for criminal justice and prison reform. His academic research addresses the deep challenges of contemporary democracy and the tragedy of criminal justice and prisons in America.

The author of three books and dozens of scholarly articles, his work has received numerous awards, including from the American Political Science Association and the International Studies Association. His most recent book is Unusually Cruel: Prisons, Punishment, and the Real American Exceptionalism. He is also a prize-winning teacher, and his "Prisons and Punishment" course has become one of the most sought-after courses at Georgetown.

This session will explore the many reasons for providing education to incarcerated people. It will highlight the tremendous benefits for incarcerated students themselves--who develop a stronger sense of self, critical reasoning skills, and debate as a tool for conflict resolution--as well as for carceral facilities, which run more smoothly and peacefully when their residents are engaged and motivated. It will provide examples from the new Georgetown Prison Scholars Program at the DC Jail, which now offers two credit-bearing courses per semester, along with a host of non-credit courses.


Tuesday May 21, 2019 12:00pm - 1:45pm
Zoom

2:00pm

Enhancing and Transforming the Core Experience - For Accepted "Transforming the Core" Participants Only
This session is only for those faculty and staff that submit letters of interest and were accepted into the
Transforming the Core Experience course development program.

More than just a set of required courses, the Georgetown Core provides a foundation that informs students’ experiences and learning across the undergraduate experience. The Core engages students with the world’s most insistent problems, current and perennial, humanistic and scientific, local and global -- problems that our students must be prepared to navigate and repair. To flourish, students need not only content knowledge from across the liberal arts but also the ability to engage fully with the complex problems and ideas that thread across the Core, through their majors, and beyond. We envision a Core experience that engages and challenges students through innovative course designs and significant projects that empower them to think creatively and strategically about the world and their roles in it.

Building on these goals, which dynamically involve multiple fields and do not address particular fields of knowledge but do emphasize engagement, application, and integration, we seek to expand on the creativity that faculty already bring to the Core by inviting new adaptations of existing courses, new configurations that might make connections across courses, and new courses, including those that integrate elements of the Core.

Speakers

Tuesday May 21, 2019 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Herman Room

2:00pm

(In-Person Attendance) - Putting the Personal into the Pedagogical: Sharing Ignatian Pedagogy with Faculty, Staff, and Students through Personal Narrative
In its Mission Examen self-study report, Georgetown committed to “implement the principles of Ignatian pedagogy across our curriculum and co-curriculum” while attending to “diverse contexts and the specific needs of students in the spirit of Cura personalis.” How to accomplish this goal? What is the best starting point for a conversation about Ignatian pedagogy?

The purpose of this workshop is to demonstrate how personal narratives of Ignatian education and formation effectively promote Ignatian pedagogy in the development of faculty, staff, and students. More than concepts to be memorized, Ignatian pedagogy comes alive when teachers model their own personal transformation in the transmission of Ignatian teaching principles. In this 60-minute workshop, academic and administrative leaders responsible for Ignatian pedagogy at the School of Continuing Studies present personal perspectives on teaching and leading the organization from their own deep personal engagement with Ignatian themes. Ideal audience for this session are faculty and administrators from across Georgetown who will take away:

• Appreciation of Ignatian pedagogy’s humanistic emphasis

• Understanding of practical starting points for initiating conversations about Ignatian pedagogy

• Insight into the various ways that members of the Georgetown faculty and staff can deepen in their personal formation in Ignatian principles

Speakers
SR

Shenita Ray

Director for Online Operations
avatar for Jamie Kralovec

Jamie Kralovec

Associate Director for Mission Integration, School of Continuing Studies


Tuesday May 21, 2019 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Film Screening Room

2:00pm

(Livestream Attendance) - Putting the Personal into the Pedagogical: Sharing Ignatian Pedagogy with Faculty, Staff, and Students through Personal Narrative
In its Mission Examen self-study report, Georgetown committed to “implement the principles of Ignatian pedagogy across our curriculum and co-curriculum” while attending to “diverse contexts and the specific needs of students in the spirit of Cura personalis.” How to accomplish this goal? What is the best starting point for a conversation about Ignatian pedagogy?

The purpose of this workshop is to demonstrate how personal narratives of Ignatian education and formation effectively promote Ignatian pedagogy in the development of faculty, staff, and students. More than concepts to be memorized, Ignatian pedagogy comes alive when teachers model their own personal transformation in the transmission of Ignatian teaching principles. In this 60-minute workshop, academic and administrative leaders responsible for Ignatian pedagogy at the School of Continuing Studies present personal perspectives on teaching and leading the organization from their own deep personal engagement with Ignatian themes. Ideal audience for this session are faculty and administrators from across Georgetown who will take away:

• Appreciation of Ignatian pedagogy’s humanistic emphasis

• Understanding of practical starting points for initiating conversations about Ignatian pedagogy

• Insight into the various ways that members of the Georgetown faculty and staff can deepen in their personal formation in Ignatian principles

Speakers
SR

Shenita Ray

Director for Online Operations
avatar for Jamie Kralovec

Jamie Kralovec

Associate Director for Mission Integration, School of Continuing Studies


Tuesday May 21, 2019 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Zoom

2:00pm

(In-Person Attendance) - Apply Universal Design for Learning (UDL)–an Accessible, Usable and Inclusive Class
Faculty members teach students with diverse backgrounds, learning needs and preferences. Universal Design for Learning (UDL) works to create a flexible and customizable learning experience for all through designs that from the beginning consider diverse needs and strengths of learners. To optimize the learning experience, faculty may apply the three key UDL principles known as multiple means of representation, expression and engagement. These principles provide faculty course design guidelines and incorporate teaching that enhances accessibility, usability and inclusivity.

This workshop is for participants to learn about the value of UDL, in order to review and apply the principles to their own courses. We will discuss application of UDL through scenarios that demonstrate the use of the three principles. The conversation will include review of course content samples such as a course syllabus, activities, assessments, and materials. Participants will walk out of the workshop with knowledge about UDL and practical suggestions for implementing the principles to their current course.

Speakers
avatar for Ann Wang

Ann Wang

Online Course Coordinator, CNDLS


Tuesday May 21, 2019 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Social Room

2:00pm

(Livestream Attendance) - Apply Universal Design for Learning (UDL)–an Accessible, Usable and Inclusive Class
Faculty members teach students with diverse backgrounds, learning needs and preferences. Universal Design for Learning (UDL) works to create a flexible and customizable learning experience for all through designs that from the beginning consider diverse needs and strengths of learners. To optimize the learning experience, faculty may apply the three key UDL principles known as multiple means of representation, expression and engagement. These principles provide faculty course design guidelines and incorporate teaching that enhances accessibility, usability and inclusivity.

This workshop is for participants to learn about the value of UDL, in order to review and apply the principles to their own courses. We will discuss application of UDL through scenarios that demonstrate the use of the three principles. The conversation will include review of course content samples such as a course syllabus, activities, assessments, and materials. Participants will walk out of the workshop with knowledge about UDL and practical suggestions for implementing the principles to their current course.

Speakers
avatar for Ann Wang

Ann Wang

Online Course Coordinator, CNDLS


Tuesday May 21, 2019 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Zoom

2:00pm

Escape Room - Sign-Up In-Person Outside G313!
Limited Capacity full

Even though this session says "Full" on Sched, there may still be spaces available for the Escape Room; however, you can only sign-up for the Escape Room via the paper sign-up sheet outside of G313 in the Healey Family Student Center! 

Sign-up each day outside of HFSC Room G313 (directly next to the main HFSC entrance) for an exciting Escape Room designed by members of the CNDLS media team! Limited slots are available.

Tuesday May 21, 2019 2:00pm - 4:10pm
G313

3:10pm

(In-Person Attendance) - Curriculum Integration with the Maker Hub
The Maker Hub in Lau, Georgetown's only makerspace serving all students, staff, and faculty, routinely works with professors from all departments to develop tours, activities, lectures, and modules that integrate hands-on learning and innovative thinking into diverse curriculum. Whether you teach entreprenership, English, anthropology, sociology, medicine or math, the community at the Maker Hub can help you reach your learning goals. In this discussion, we'll examine some past efforts of the Maker Hub, hear from professors who have benefitted from engaging with the space, and help attendees brainstorm ways to enhance their own curriculum through making.

Speakers
avatar for Don Undeen

Don Undeen

Manager of Maker Hub, Georgetown University
I like making spaces for creativity and innovation. Talk to me about fabrication, coding, and creative technology!


Tuesday May 21, 2019 3:10pm - 4:10pm
Film Screening Room

3:10pm

(Livestream Attendance) - Curriculum Integration with the Maker Hub
The Maker Hub in Lau, Georgetown's only makerspace serving all students, staff, and faculty, routinely works with professors from all departments to develop tours, activities, lectures, and modules that integrate hands-on learning and innovative thinking into diverse curriculum. Whether you teach entreprenership, English, anthropology, sociology, medicine or math, the community at the Maker Hub can help you reach your learning goals. In this discussion, we'll examine some past efforts of the Maker Hub, hear from professors who have benefitted from engaging with the space, and help attendees brainstorm ways to enhance their own curriculum through making.

Speakers
avatar for Don Undeen

Don Undeen

Manager of Maker Hub, Georgetown University
I like making spaces for creativity and innovation. Talk to me about fabrication, coding, and creative technology!


Tuesday May 21, 2019 3:10pm - 4:10pm
Zoom

3:10pm

(In-Person Attendance) - The Student Sense of Belonging at Georgetown: What We’ve Learned from the Data and Where We Go Next
Georgetown is committed to a whole-institution approach to issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion. As part of efforts to better understand academic, financial, social and structural barriers affecting student success, The Hub for Equity and Innovation in Higher Education - working in partnership with the Georgetown Scholars Program and Community Scholars Program - conducted a study on attitudes of belonging among first-generation college students. For this study, we are using SenseMaker, a novel, narrative-based research tool that allows for a rich, mixed methods approach to understanding complex issues inherent in students’ sense of belonging. The tool guides individuals through the telling and interpretation of a short story and then aggregates these annotations into a network model, revealing larger patterns that traditional surveys fail to uncover. In addition to informing changes to practices on our own campus, we hope to contribute to the broader national conversations with this research.

We hope that faculty, staff and students from diverse campus units join us at this session. Audience members will learn about survey findings and be asked to brainstorm structural solutions in their respective units for improving the first-generation student experience at Georgetown. Audience members will also have the opportunity to learn more about the narrative survey tool and consider how it might be adaptable to their own research questions.

Speakers
avatar for Adanna Johnson

Adanna Johnson

Associate Vice President for Student Equity and Inclusion


Tuesday May 21, 2019 3:10pm - 4:10pm
Social Room

3:10pm

(Livestream Attendance) - The Student Sense of Belonging at Georgetown: What We’ve Learned from the Data and Where We Go Next
Georgetown is committed to a whole-institution approach to issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion. As part of efforts to better understand academic, financial, social and structural barriers affecting student success, The Hub for Equity and Innovation in Higher Education - working in partnership with the Georgetown Scholars Program and Community Scholars Program - conducted a study on attitudes of belonging among first-generation college students. For this study, we are using SenseMaker, a novel, narrative-based research tool that allows for a rich, mixed methods approach to understanding complex issues inherent in students’ sense of belonging. The tool guides individuals through the telling and interpretation of a short story and then aggregates these annotations into a network model, revealing larger patterns that traditional surveys fail to uncover. In addition to informing changes to practices on our own campus, we hope to contribute to the broader national conversations with this research.

We hope that faculty, staff and students from diverse campus units join us at this session. Audience members will learn about survey findings and be asked to brainstorm structural solutions in their respective units for improving the first-generation student experience at Georgetown. Audience members will also have the opportunity to learn more about the narrative survey tool and consider how it might be adaptable to their own research questions.

Speakers
avatar for Adanna Johnson

Adanna Johnson

Associate Vice President for Student Equity and Inclusion


Tuesday May 21, 2019 3:10pm - 4:10pm
Zoom

3:10pm

Teaching to Improve Students’ Writing
Want your students to write better? You can help them improve by using models and critiques and by providing constructive but targeted feedback. In this workshop, we’ll introduce and practice some techniques for helping students learn to recognize how good writing works, and we’ll share some strategies for providing effective feedback without overwhelming your students or yourself.


Tuesday May 21, 2019 3:10pm - 4:40pm
Herman Room

4:15pm

Red House / Baker Trust for Transformational Learning Social Hour
Join the Red House and the Baker Trust for Transformational Learning for drinks and snacks as you reflect on your day at TLISI.

Tuesday May 21, 2019 4:15pm - 6:00pm
Great Room

4:30pm

(Livestream Attendance) - Designing Your Course in Canvas
This presentation is for faculty who want to better understand how to organize their course in Canvas and to optimize it for student learning, engagement, and assessment.


The presentation will address the following topics:

How do you want students navigate your course?
How can you organize your course’s content?
How can students do course work in Canvas?
How can students collaborate in Canvas?
How can you use Canvas to assess students’ work?



Participants will learn:

How to use the home page and modules to present and organize course content
How to use the Canvas calendar and Inbox
How to use assignments and the gradebook


Tuesday May 21, 2019 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Zoom
 
Wednesday, May 22
 

9:00am

Breakfast (Open to All)
Wednesday May 22, 2019 9:00am - 9:45am
Great Room

9:00am

Qigong & Wellness: Teachable Moments for All
This wellness session is designed to introduce Qigong, the mind-body practice that reduces stress levels, enhances vitality and calmness, and brings renewed focus for teachable moments! Qigong combines gentle movement, deep breathing, and meditation to help facilitate physical, emotional and spiritual benefits allowing for sustained resilience professionally and personally. We will learn simple qigong movements applicable to any learning environment to help you feel energized, relaxed and centered for the rest of the day.

Speakers

Wednesday May 22, 2019 9:00am - 9:50am
Dance Studio B

9:00am

Open Registration & Name Badge Pick-Up - 9:00 - 3:00pm
Swing by the registration table in the Great Room to pick up your name badges or submit your last-minute registration for TLISI.

Wednesday May 22, 2019 9:00am - 3:00pm
Great Room

9:30am

9:45am

FTNTL Town Hall meeting
The Joint Main Campus Committee for FTNTL Issues will hold its annual Town Hall-style meeting at the end of the academic year during TLISI. We hope for increased attendance from colleagues this way. The first part of the session will include a report by the chair and various committee members who represent FTNTL faculty on university-wide committees such as on governance, merit, etc. The second half will be Q & A and ask for input from FTNTL colleagues on prioritizing the committee's work.

Speakers
avatar for Astrid Weigert

Astrid Weigert

Teaching Professor, Dept of German
Full-time non-tenure line issues at GUlanguage teaching, business culture in foreign language coursesTeaching to Mission


Wednesday May 22, 2019 9:45am - 10:45am
Herman Room

9:45am

(In-Person Attendance) - Reflection: You and Your Educational Space
This workshop offers a practical space for exploring the third dynamic of the Ignatian Pedagogical Paradigm (IPP): Reflection. While not unique to Ignatian-inspired teaching, Reflection is intimately tied to the visionary characteristics of Jesuit Education - comprehensive, world-affirming, with an emphasis on freedom. Reflection is not a goal in and of itself; as a practice, it allows learners (including educators) to add meaning and understanding to who they are becoming. How does content or experience change a learner's view of the world, of themselves? It is through Reflection that learners can hear the call for resultant actions and build the physical, mental, spiritual, and moral resources to pursue them. In this workshop, we explore Reflection - and discernment - as understood through Ignatian Pedagogy. We will workshop ways as educators that we can create a habit for the self-work of Reflection as part of the process towards introducing Reflection as a pedagogical tool in our educational spaces. All types of educational spaces will be considered in this workshop - online, in classrooms, credit-bearing, co-curricular, immersive, experiential, etc. All educators are welcome to this workshop - staff, faculty, NTL, tenured, administrators, adjunct, graduate students, and any not listed list here.

Speakers
avatar for Andria Wisler

Andria Wisler

Executive Director, Center for Social Justice Georgetown University
avatar for Amanda Munroe

Amanda Munroe

Assistant Director, Social Justice Curriculum & Pedagogy, Georgetown University Center for Social Justice
My role at Georgetown is Assistant Director, Social Justice Curriculum & Pedagogy at Georgetown University’s Center for Social Justice Research, Teaching, and Service. I manage community-based learning programs, develop global partnerships for social justice immersion and support... Read More →


Wednesday May 22, 2019 9:45am - 10:45am
Film Screening Room

9:45am

(Livestream Attendance) - Reflection: You and Your Educational Space
This workshop offers a practical space for exploring the third dynamic of the Ignatian Pedagogical Paradigm (IPP): Reflection. While not unique to Ignatian-inspired teaching, Reflection is intimately tied to the visionary characteristics of Jesuit Education - comprehensive, world-affirming, with an emphasis on freedom. Reflection is not a goal in and of itself; as a practice, it allows learners (including educators) to add meaning and understanding to who they are becoming. How does content or experience change a learner's view of the world, of themselves? It is through Reflection that learners can hear the call for resultant actions and build the physical, mental, spiritual, and moral resources to pursue them. In this workshop, we explore Reflection - and discernment - as understood through Ignatian Pedagogy. We will workshop ways as educators that we can create a habit for the self-work of Reflection as part of the process towards introducing Reflection as a pedagogical tool in our educational spaces. All types of educational spaces will be considered in this workshop - online, in classrooms, credit-bearing, co-curricular, immersive, experiential, etc. All educators are welcome to this workshop - staff, faculty, NTL, tenured, administrators, adjunct, graduate students, and any not listed list here.

Speakers
avatar for Andria Wisler

Andria Wisler

Executive Director, Center for Social Justice Georgetown University
avatar for Amanda Munroe

Amanda Munroe

Assistant Director, Social Justice Curriculum & Pedagogy, Georgetown University Center for Social Justice
My role at Georgetown is Assistant Director, Social Justice Curriculum & Pedagogy at Georgetown University’s Center for Social Justice Research, Teaching, and Service. I manage community-based learning programs, develop global partnerships for social justice immersion and support... Read More →


Wednesday May 22, 2019 9:45am - 10:45am
Zoom

9:45am

Making the Invisible Visible: Student Art Influencing Teaching & Learning
Which of our students are pushed to the margins on the Georgetown campus? What would happen if we centered those experiences? Could we shift future student experience at Georgetown?

Through the (In)Visibility at Georgetown: Past, Present, and Future campus-wide exhibit supported by the Office of the Provost and the Division of Student Affairs, student artists aimed to answer these questions by making the invisible visible. Drawing from the experiences of marginalized students on campus, this display of student artwork intended to center these realities for the broader campus community.

In this session for faculty and student-facing staff, we will examine works from (In)Visibility at Georgetown: Past, Present, and Future in order to inform our future work with students. In an exercise based in the emergent practices of object-based learning in higher education, participants will engage and interact with pieces from the exhibit. Through the object-based learning practices, session participants will experience how the act of close-looking can serve as a learning, teaching, and reflection tool while also discovering more about the student artwork. Participants will also have the opportunity to learn about the genesis of the exhibit as well as discuss the possibilities of student artwork to shape future student experiences.

Speakers
avatar for Adanna Johnson

Adanna Johnson

Associate Vice President for Student Equity and Inclusion


Wednesday May 22, 2019 9:45am - 10:45am
Social Room

9:45am

Escape Room - Sign-Up In-Person Outside G313!
Limited Capacity full

Even though this session says "Full" on Sched, there may still be spaces available for the Escape Room; however, you can only sign-up for the Escape Room via the paper sign-up sheet outside of G313 in the Healey Family Student Center! 

Sign-up each day outside of HFSC Room G313 (directly next to the main HFSC entrance) for an exciting Escape Room designed by members of the CNDLS media team! Limited slots are available.

Wednesday May 22, 2019 9:45am - 11:55am
G313

10:55am

Classroom-based Undergraduate Research Experiences: The CURE for Teaching and Learning in STEM?
Classroom-based Undergraduate Research Experiences or CUREs are gaining currency among STEM faculty in many disciplines, including Biology, Chemistry, and Physics. Advantages include getting more students of diverse backgrounds involved in authentic research (i.e., research projects with an unknown outcome and of importance to stakeholders including the scientific community) than can be accommodated using the traditional summer research model. Disadvantages can include costs for equipment and supplies, and sacrificing content in order to have time for hands-on work.

In this session, I will discuss some of the theory behind the development and implementation of CUREs, practical benefits to students and instructors, as well as some of the hurdles that need to be overcome in order to set up and maintain a CURE. I will also discuss some of the resources are available for faculty interested in adopting an existing CURE or developing one of their own. I will also demonstrate the CURE model using a hands-on activity for participants.

Speakers

Wednesday May 22, 2019 10:55am - 11:55am
Herman Room

10:55am

10:55am

10:55am

(In-Person Attendance) - "Sleep When You're Dead": Achievement-Orientation in Student Leadership Practice
The most recent Georgetown University Intellectual Life Report states that “the pressures to participate in club culture, internships, and other dimensions of social life at Georgetown create a frenetic environment where students find their time split between the intellectual activities of their courses and social and pre-professional lives they wish to pursue.” (Intellectual Life Report, 2018, p. 38). For many reasons, students employ an achievement-oriented approach to their Georgetown pursuits, both academic and extra-curricular. This approach manifests itself in hyper-awareness of the regard of others, a sense of competition for roles and experiences, and increased focus on social capital. Current events and social media further complicate the perception of achievement in a high-prestige university environment. Achievement-orientation may impact the development of process-based, relational leadership skills. This presentation provides context and considerations for the ways that achievement-orientation impacts Georgetown students’ leadership identity development by presenting findings from a qualitative research study. The presentation will include implications for achievement-orientation in other aspects of Georgetown students’ learning and development, and provide opportunity for conversation about interventions and strategies to mitigate the practical and at times, negative effects of this approach.

Speakers
AS

Ali Stowe

Associate Director for Student Engagement
Ali Stowe graduated from Texas A&M University with a degree in English Rhetoric and then completed her Master's (MAEd) degree in Educational Leadership & Policy at Virginia Tech. She joined the Center for Student Engagement at Georgetown University in 2017 and currently serves as... Read More →


Wednesday May 22, 2019 10:55am - 11:55am
Film Screening Room

10:55am

(Livestream Attendance) - "Sleep When You're Dead": Achievement-Orientation in Student Leadership Practice
The most recent Georgetown University Intellectual Life Report states that “the pressures to participate in club culture, internships, and other dimensions of social life at Georgetown create a frenetic environment where students find their time split between the intellectual activities of their courses and social and pre-professional lives they wish to pursue.” (Intellectual Life Report, 2018, p. 38). For many reasons, students employ an achievement-oriented approach to their Georgetown pursuits, both academic and extra-curricular. This approach manifests itself in hyper-awareness of the regard of others, a sense of competition for roles and experiences, and increased focus on social capital. Current events and social media further complicate the perception of achievement in a high-prestige university environment. Achievement-orientation may impact the development of process-based, relational leadership skills. This presentation provides context and considerations for the ways that achievement-orientation impacts Georgetown students’ leadership identity development by presenting findings from a qualitative research study. The presentation will include implications for achievement-orientation in other aspects of Georgetown students’ learning and development, and provide opportunity for conversation about interventions and strategies to mitigate the practical and at times, negative effects of this approach.

Speakers
AS

Ali Stowe

Associate Director for Student Engagement
Ali Stowe graduated from Texas A&M University with a degree in English Rhetoric and then completed her Master's (MAEd) degree in Educational Leadership & Policy at Virginia Tech. She joined the Center for Student Engagement at Georgetown University in 2017 and currently serves as... Read More →


Wednesday May 22, 2019 10:55am - 11:55am
Zoom

12:00pm

(In-Person Attendance) - Lunch Plenary - The New Academy: Trends for Future American Universities
Bryan Alexander is an internationally known futurist, researcher, writer, speaker, consultant, and teacher, working in the field of how technology transforms education.  
Bryan taught literature, writing, multimedia, and information technology studies at Centenary College of Louisiana, where he pioneered multi-campus interdisciplinary classes, while organizing an information literacy initiative.

From 2002 to 2014, Bryan worked with the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education (NITLE), a non-profit working to help small colleges and universities best integrate digital technologies. With NITLE, he held several roles, including co-director of a regional education and technology center, director of emerging technologies, and senior fellow. Over those years Bryan helped develop and support the nonprofit, grew peer networks, consulted, and conducted a sustained research agenda.

In 2013 Bryan launched a business, Bryan Alexander Consulting, LLC.  Through BAC he consults throughout higher education in the United States and abroad.

This session will begin by developing present-day trends likely to shape higher education's futures. They include trends from outside the academy that nonetheless impact universities, including forces from demographics, macroeconomics, culture, policy, and geopolitics. Technological change drivers receive particular attention, from 3d printing to digital video, artificial intelligence, and the rapidly changing device ecosystem.

We then shift to explore trends within higher education. These include changes in enrollment, finance, and equity. They also include the intersection of education with technology.
The session concludes by presenting several scenarios for future universities.

Speakers

Wednesday May 22, 2019 12:00pm - 1:45pm
Great Room

12:00pm

(Livestream Attendance) - Lunch Plenary - The New Academy: Trends for Future American Universities
Bryan Alexander is an internationally known futurist, researcher, writer, speaker, consultant, and teacher, working in the field of how technology transforms education.  
Bryan taught literature, writing, multimedia, and information technology studies at Centenary College of Louisiana, where he pioneered multi-campus interdisciplinary classes, while organizing an information literacy initiative.

From 2002 to 2014, Bryan worked with the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education (NITLE), a non-profit working to help small colleges and universities best integrate digital technologies. With NITLE, he held several roles, including co-director of a regional education and technology center, director of emerging technologies, and senior fellow. Over those years Bryan helped develop and support the nonprofit, grew peer networks, consulted, and conducted a sustained research agenda.

In 2013 Bryan launched a business, Bryan Alexander Consulting, LLC.  Through BAC he consults throughout higher education in the United States and abroad.

This session will begin by developing present-day trends likely to shape higher education's futures. They include trends from outside the academy that nonetheless impact universities, including forces from demographics, macroeconomics, culture, policy, and geopolitics. Technological change drivers receive particular attention, from 3d printing to digital video, artificial intelligence, and the rapidly changing device ecosystem.

We then shift to explore trends within higher education. These include changes in enrollment, finance, and equity. They also include the intersection of education with technology.
The session concludes by presenting several scenarios for future universities.

Speakers

Wednesday May 22, 2019 12:00pm - 1:45pm
Zoom

2:00pm

Getting to Know Lauinger: Library Tour of Special Collections, MakerHub & the Gelardin New Media Center - 2:00 - 3:00pm
Join us to tour different spaces within Lauinger Library and learn about the different tools and services offered! Library staff will guide you through 15-minute walk-throughs of different Library spaces.

Please meet at the Booth Family Center for Special Collections, 5th Floor Lauinger Library at 2:00pm for this tour.
  • Did You Know?" An Open House with Special Collections (15 min) -5th Floor Lauinger Library
  • Maker Hub Tour (15 min) -1st Floor Lauinger Library
  • GNMC Tour and Showcase (15 min) -1st Floor Lauinger Library
  • VR Demo (15 min) - 1st Floor Lauinger Library


Speakers
AR

Amy Richards

Multimedia Specialist
avatar for Don Undeen

Don Undeen

Manager of Maker Hub, Georgetown University
I like making spaces for creativity and innovation. Talk to me about fabrication, coding, and creative technology!
NB

Noah Bickford

Operations Manager, GNMC
avatar for Barrinton Baynes

Barrinton Baynes

Multimedia Project Manager, Gelardin New Media Center


2:00pm

(In-Person Attendance) - Build & Belong: Interventions for Reducing Georgetown Medical Students’ Perceptions of Isolation & Stress by Improving Sense of Belonging"
We propose convening a workshop that explores the recent research we undertook to address issues of student learning and wellness within the learning environment at the Georgetown School of Medicine.

The Build & Belong study at Georgetown School of Medicine, launched in May 2017, set out to explore how to improve medical students’ wellbeing and resilience in medical school by reducing ‘belonging uncertainty’-- a concept explaining one’s sense of belonging in new social and academic settings, especially if one is targeted by negative stereotypes. Guided by theories of social belongingness in primarily undergraduate academic environments, an evidence-based model of social belonging was adapted for the medical school academic environment.

The workshop will feature study design, focus group information, data analysis insights, and address promising strategies moving forward to implement in other learning environments across Georgetown. Outcomes from the workshop include gleaning insights around social belonging informed strategies and discussion of adoption of similar promising strategies at other campuses.

Our goal was to develop a better understanding of the potential impact of influencing medical students’ sense of belonging, given experiences of depression, burnout, distress and social isolation experienced in medical school. The Build & Belong Campaign explored the value of vulnerability, convenience of access to program information, community building, and faculty awareness.. Insights generated by this research will potentially contribute to new psychosocial intervention research in the medical education realm. Other undergraduate and medical schools and graduate schools (business, policy, education) may also be interested in implications of our research as they endeavor to reduce stress and create a culture of well-being at their schools.


Speakers
avatar for David Taylor

David Taylor

Senior Associate Dean for Student Learning, Georgetown University School of Medicine
David Taylor joined the Georgetown University School of Medicine family in July 1990. In his role as the Senior Associate Dean for Student Learning, Dean Taylor is responsible for initiatives that promote the retention and advancement of medical students through the four-year curriculum... Read More →


Wednesday May 22, 2019 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Herman Room

2:00pm

(LivestreamAttendance) - Build & Belong: Interventions for Reducing Georgetown Medical Students’ Perceptions of Isolation & Stress by Improving Sense of Belonging"
We propose convening a workshop that explores the recent research we undertook to address issues of student learning and wellness within the learning environment at the Georgetown School of Medicine.

The Build & Belong study at Georgetown School of Medicine, launched in May 2017, set out to explore how to improve medical students’ wellbeing and resilience in medical school by reducing ‘belonging uncertainty’-- a concept explaining one’s sense of belonging in new social and academic settings, especially if one is targeted by negative stereotypes. Guided by theories of social belongingness in primarily undergraduate academic environments, an evidence-based model of social belonging was adapted for the medical school academic environment.

The workshop will feature study design, focus group information, data analysis insights, and address promising strategies moving forward to implement in other learning environments across Georgetown. Outcomes from the workshop include gleaning insights around social belonging informed strategies and discussion of adoption of similar promising strategies at other campuses.

Our goal was to develop a better understanding of the potential impact of influencing medical students’ sense of belonging, given experiences of depression, burnout, distress and social isolation experienced in medical school. The Build & Belong Campaign explored the value of vulnerability, convenience of access to program information, community building, and faculty awareness.. Insights generated by this research will potentially contribute to new psychosocial intervention research in the medical education realm. Other undergraduate and medical schools and graduate schools (business, policy, education) may also be interested in implications of our research as they endeavor to reduce stress and create a culture of well-being at their schools.


Speakers
avatar for David Taylor

David Taylor

Senior Associate Dean for Student Learning, Georgetown University School of Medicine
David Taylor joined the Georgetown University School of Medicine family in July 1990. In his role as the Senior Associate Dean for Student Learning, Dean Taylor is responsible for initiatives that promote the retention and advancement of medical students through the four-year curriculum... Read More →


Wednesday May 22, 2019 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Zoom

2:00pm

Topics in Inclusive Pedagogy: Approaches and Strategies for Inclusive Assessment
Current conversations in higher education have helped highlight the importance of developing assignments and assessments aimed at achieving outcomes that are both learning-focussed and equity-centered. How might we ask students to practice and perform what they are learning in asset-based ways that connect to who our students are and the strengths that they bring to the classroom? How can we create diverse ways for students to demonstrate their growing proficiencies? This workshop will raise some of the key issues to consider for designing inclusive assessments, and will outline strategies and approaches for educators and practitioners.

This workshop is designed for faculty and student-facing staff in order to support them in examining inclusive practices and approaches to assessment. Strategies that will be outlined include: blind grading to counter biases; multi-modal assessments that give students some choice in how they demonstrate what they have learned; contract or co-constructed assessments to create student agency in how they are graded; and increasing explicit communication with students about the norms of assessment and grading within a given discipline. Participants will explore ways to integrate inclusive assessment design into their practices.

Speakers
MO

Michelle Ohnona

Program Manager for Diversity Initiatives


Wednesday May 22, 2019 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Film Screening Room

2:00pm

Canvas Build-a-Course Workshop - 2:00 - 4:10pm
This workshop is a hands-on opportunity to create or revise your course in Canvas. Choose your own learning path! If you are new to Canvas or want to refresh your knowledge, there will be a series of videos and staff present to provide guidance as you get started with Canvas. If you prefer to set your own pace and direction, there will be online guides to help you navigate both beginner and advanced Canvas resources. Staff from CNDLS will be on hand to answer questions that come up as you work. Join us to get a jump start on your summer or fall courses!


Wednesday May 22, 2019 2:00pm - 4:10pm
Social Room

3:10pm

3:10pm

3:10pm

Getting to Know Lauinger: Library Tour of Special Collections, MakerHub & the Gelardin New Media Center - 3:10 - 4:10pm
Join us to tour different spaces within Lauinger Library and learn about the different tools and services offered! Library staff will guide you through 15-minute walk-throughs of different Library spaces.

Please meet at the Booth Family Center for Special Collections, 5th Floor Lauinger Library at 2:00pm for this tour.

  • Did You Know?" An Open House with Special Collections (15 min) -5th Floor Lauinger Library
  • Maker Hub Tour (15 min) -1st Floor Lauinger Library
  • GNMC Tour and Showcase (15 min) -1st Floor Lauinger Library
  • Barrinton Baynes VR Demo (15 min) - 1st Floor Lauinger Library


Speakers
AR

Amy Richards

Multimedia Specialist
avatar for Barrinton Baynes

Barrinton Baynes

Multimedia Project Manager, Gelardin New Media Center
NB

Noah Bickford

Operations Manager, GNMC
avatar for Don Undeen

Don Undeen

Manager of Maker Hub, Georgetown University
I like making spaces for creativity and innovation. Talk to me about fabrication, coding, and creative technology!


3:10pm

Connecting with Our Students: Student Voices on What Matters
As part of the Mentoring Initiative project, we asked a range of Georgetown undergrads the following question: "What is one thing a faculty member did to help you feel like you belonged in a course and/or on campus?". Their answers offer wonderful insight into the many small and big things that we as educators could do to support students connections to us and their learning. We will screen a brief video with participants to share our students’ responses, and then open up the conversation to consider our students’ advice and how we might design our courses and our engagements with students around their insights.

This session is designed for faculty and student-facing staff/administrators with the goal of creating a shared conversation about what students say matters when it comes to supporting their sense of belonging, connection to us and to each other, and contributing to their learning and growth while at Georgetown.
  • What do students say about the impact of faculty on their experiences? 
  • What can we do more of or do better? 
Between the students’ insights and our group conversation, we hope to develop a strong understanding of successful practices for faculty and staff—what has worked; what hasn’t worked; and how do they handle tough situations.

Speakers
JW

Jen Woolard

Associate Professor


Wednesday May 22, 2019 3:10pm - 4:10pm
Herman Room

4:15pm

Learning, Design, and Technology Ice Cream Social Hour
Join us for a Ben & Jerry's ice cream social to mix and mingle with your Georgetown colleagues!

Wednesday May 22, 2019 4:15pm - 6:00pm
Great Room

4:30pm

(Livestream Attendance) - Canvas Open Office Hours
Get a jump-start on your summer and fall courses in Canvas. Join these online office hours to receive hands-on help from UIS.

Topics typically covered:
- Copy Canvas course content from one course to another
- Tips for organizing course material in Canvas
- Migrate Blackboard course content to Canvas
- Cross-list (combine) Canvas courses
- And many more...


Wednesday May 22, 2019 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Zoom
 
Thursday, May 23
 

8:30am

Silent Group Meditation
Join the John Main Center for 30-minutes of quiet reflection and meditation.  

Thursday May 23, 2019 8:30am - 9:00am
John Main Center

9:00am

Breakfast (Open to All)
Thursday May 23, 2019 9:00am - 9:45am
Great Room

9:00am

Mindful Movement and Meditation
We will discuss helpful tools to reduce stress and burnout and add clarity to the mind, body and spirit. Useful tools that can be performed in work clothes, in the chair or standing. No experience required. Paige Lichens is a 500Hr Licensed Yoga & Meditation Teacher, DC native and been teaching for the past 10+ years. To learn more: paigesyoga.com for useful health articles, workshops, books, and tips.

Speakers

Thursday May 23, 2019 9:00am - 9:50am
Dance Studio B

9:30am

9:45am

(In-Person Attendance) - Grading with Intention: Addressing Bias and Other Assessment Challenges
In this session, presenters examine three common assessment challenges and share practical strategies for reflecting on and dealing with each. The session is geared toward professors and teaching assistants who desire to increase transparency, consistency and fairness as they grade various aspects of their students’ work.

The first challenge is halo bias, which refers to the fact that “teacher expectations can influence the way in which a student’s performance is interpreted” (Batten, et al., 2013). In other words, an instructor might unknowingly be harsh or lenient when grading due to an overall impression of a student or the quality of a student’s prior work. The second is fairly assessing group work, a cornerstone of cooperative learning that is widely encouraged in education pedagogy, but which can be a challenge to grade because often “the work of the individual is lost in the product of the group” (Nordberg, 2008). The third challenge is assessing class participation. While many instructors have a "feeling" for good versus inadequate participation, it can be daunting to translate that perception into a criterion-based assessment tool.

Attendees leave with raised awareness of these assessment challenges and with tools and strategies to address them in their teaching contexts.

Speakers
avatar for Heather Gregg Zitlau

Heather Gregg Zitlau

Heather has been teaching in the English Language Center (formerly the Center for Language Education and Development) since 2012.


Thursday May 23, 2019 9:45am - 10:45am
Social Room

9:45am

(Livestream Attendance) - Grading with Intention: Addressing Bias and Other Assessment Challenges
In this session, presenters examine three common assessment challenges and share practical strategies for reflecting on and dealing with each. The session is geared toward professors and teaching assistants who desire to increase transparency, consistency and fairness as they grade various aspects of their students’ work.

The first challenge is halo bias, which refers to the fact that “teacher expectations can influence the way in which a student’s performance is interpreted” (Batten, et al., 2013). In other words, an instructor might unknowingly be harsh or lenient when grading due to an overall impression of a student or the quality of a student’s prior work. The second is fairly assessing group work, a cornerstone of cooperative learning that is widely encouraged in education pedagogy, but which can be a challenge to grade because often “the work of the individual is lost in the product of the group” (Nordberg, 2008). The third challenge is assessing class participation. While many instructors have a "feeling" for good versus inadequate participation, it can be daunting to translate that perception into a criterion-based assessment tool.

Attendees leave with raised awareness of these assessment challenges and with tools and strategies to address them in their teaching contexts.

Speakers
avatar for Heather Gregg Zitlau

Heather Gregg Zitlau

Heather has been teaching in the English Language Center (formerly the Center for Language Education and Development) since 2012.


Thursday May 23, 2019 9:45am - 10:45am
Zoom

9:45am

Design to the Edges; Design for All
Georgetown University encompasses a diverse student body. Each learner has a unique profile of strengths and challenges across the varied cognitive abilities and academic skills necessary for scholastic success. Curricula that are designed to support the extremes of those ranges benefit all students. Inclusive design enables access for students who might otherwise struggle, and deepens understanding and engagement for all.

This interactive workshop will begin with a brief description of characteristics and causes of ADHD and dyslexia, two of the most prevalent “hidden disabilities” impacting our students. Next, participants will engage in brief simulations of dyslexia (from the International Dyslexia Association,) and ADHD. These simulations will help illustrate that minor situational variations in an educational environment can greatly thwart or facilitate learning.

Finally, the workshop practice will focus on identifying aspects of our own courses that could be adjusted to better support learners’ comprehension and expression of knowledge. This includes discussion and practice incorporating teaching strategies that increase students’ understanding of complex topics and variations on ways to assess student knowledge. Participants can use this workshop time to develop concrete changes. Additionally, general accommodations and modifications will be provided and can be adapted to fit specific subjects or topics.


Thursday May 23, 2019 9:45am - 10:45am
Film Screening Room

9:45am

Making the Most of Canvas
This workshop will provide practical tips for making the most of Canvas’s features, including "hidden" and recently added features, for managing course logistics and communications and for assessing student work. It is for instructors who have a basic understanding of Canvas and are ready to explore beneath the surface of modules, pages and files. Topics include: leveraging announcements and ungraded assignments, integrating Google docs in Canvas, creating appointments and signup sheets in the calendar, and managing grades. There will be opportunities for hands-on practice and discussion.

Speakers

Thursday May 23, 2019 9:45am - 10:45am
Herman Room

10:55am

(In-Person Attendance) - VET Ally
Georgetown University’s Veterans Office held its first Veteran Education Training (VET) Ally Program in 2013 to start a dialogue among the campus community to identify the strengths and challenges service members, veterans, and military family members face while pursuing their academic and career goals in a civilian environment. The Society of Jesus, also known as the Jesuits, was founded by St. Ignatius of Loyola after recovering from a battle wound and overcoming the challenges he faced while transitioning from being a warrior to a civilian. The VET Ally Program provides our campus with a visible network of knowledgeable supporters of service members, veterans, and military families as the pursue personal, academic, and professional goals. The seminar covers many topics of great importance to military students studying at Georgetown. Participants are offered a handbook that serves as a resource to help VET Allies support the military community. VET Allies are also issued a decal to display in their office or space to highlight that the space is military-friendly.


Thursday May 23, 2019 10:55am - 11:55am
Social Room

10:55am

(Livestream Attendance) - VET Ally
Georgetown University’s Veterans Office held its first Veteran Education Training (VET) Ally Program in 2013 to start a dialogue among the campus community to identify the strengths and challenges service members, veterans, and military family members face while pursuing their academic and career goals in a civilian environment. The Society of Jesus, also known as the Jesuits, was founded by St. Ignatius of Loyola after recovering from a battle wound and overcoming the challenges he faced while transitioning from being a warrior to a civilian. The VET Ally Program provides our campus with a visible network of knowledgeable supporters of service members, veterans, and military families as the pursue personal, academic, and professional goals. The seminar covers many topics of great importance to military students studying at Georgetown. Participants are offered a handbook that serves as a resource to help VET Allies support the military community. VET Allies are also issued a decal to display in their office or space to highlight that the space is military-friendly.


Thursday May 23, 2019 10:55am - 11:55am
Zoom

10:55am

Teaching the Ugly Bits: A Discussion on Using Problematic Canonical Figures and Texts to Teach Diversity and Inclusion
Many of our courses include a goal to help students engage diversity and inclusion with an eye toward understanding and changing the systemic forces that create inequity. At a foundational level, doing so means to interrogate the sources that created and perpetuated the ideas that continue to prevent equity—many of which show up in the canons of our respective disciplines.

Sections of Thomas Jefferson’s Notes on the State of Virginia are fundamentally racist and deeply problematic. However, because Jefferson held the pen, his ideas mattered and thus contributed to the systemic forces that continue to perpetuate inequity. We will use my experiences teaching “the ugly bits” of Jefferson as a case study to examine the following:

1) How may revisiting canonical, and yet deeply problematic, figures and texts aid in our work of engaging diversity?
2) If there is utility in working on these texts, not for the purpose of revering them, but for the purpose of critiquing them, does this utility outweigh the potential trauma it may cause students or the inadvertent reinforcement of these figures as canonical?
3) How do we communicate to students the reasons why we are reading these canonical, yet problematic, figures and texts?

Speakers

Thursday May 23, 2019 10:55am - 11:55am
Herman Room

10:55am

Podcasting with a Purpose
As podcasting continues to grow in popularity across mainstream culture and academia, it is important for interested faculty and staff to approach this process with intentionality. In this panel we will gather staff and faculty from across disciplines and departments to explore how to effectively use this medium to enhance teaching, learning, and scholarship. Panelists will discuss how they have used podcasting in lieu of traditional class assignments, for sharing their research, for providing informal avenues of learning, and for helping students build digital literacy skills. Panelists will also discuss technical and thematic best practices of using this exciting format.


Thursday May 23, 2019 10:55am - 11:55am
Film Screening Room

12:10pm

(In-Person Attendance) - Lunch Plenary - How Do Universities Confront Their Pasts?
Sponsored by the Office of the President
Professor Kathy Powers is an Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of New Mexico. She is interested in the nature of institutional authority as well as institutional change and effects. Much of her present research focuses on the design of international institutions and law with respect to human rights, restorative justice, trade, and war. Specifically, she examines the institutional and legal determinants of transitional justice in the form of global reparations efforts following mass human rights violations, the international legal personality of international organizations, and how regional economic institutions that transform into military organizations impact war.

Speakers

Thursday May 23, 2019 12:10pm - 1:50pm
Great Room

12:10pm

(Livestream Attendance) - Lunch Plenary - How Do Universities Confront Their Pasts?
Sponsored by the Office of the President
Professor Kathy Powers is an Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of New Mexico. She is interested in the nature of institutional authority as well as institutional change and effects. Much of her present research focuses on the design of international institutions and law with respect to human rights, restorative justice, trade, and war. Specifically, she examines the institutional and legal determinants of transitional justice in the form of global reparations efforts following mass human rights violations, the international legal personality of international organizations, and how regional economic institutions that transform into military organizations impact war.

Speakers

Thursday May 23, 2019 12:10pm - 1:50pm
Great Room

2:00pm

(In-Person Attendance) - Talking about Teaching: A Collaborative Approach to Graduate Student Pedagogical Education - 2:00 - 2:30pm
We spend so much time as graduate students thinking, writing, and talking about our research and fields of interests that we sometimes lose sight of the importance of being as effective educators as we are scholars. Despite the fact that most doctoral programs are designed to produce future faculty, much of our pedagogical training is informal and little of it geared toward the likely non-Georgetown students we will one day teach. Realizing this, we decided to create a collaborative space for teaching and learning. “Talking about Teaching” is a space for graduate students to meet monthly to discuss how to support students and implement best practices in the classroom.

The Ignatian ideal of cura personalis naturally lends itself to considering the whole student when we design lessons and policies and establish teaching relationships. In our monthly “Talking about Teaching” meetings, we focus not only on how best to serve Georgetown students as Teaching Assistants and Fellows, but also how to prepare for working in classrooms in universities and colleges beyond the hilltop. The typical U.S. college student looks much different than a Georgetown student — 26 percent are single parents, many are first generation, and those from lower income families are more likely to not complete a degree. We want to leave Georgetown with the pedagogical skills needed to share our subject matter expertise with students of all backgrounds and abilities.

Our panel presentation will provide an overview of the work that we have been doing through our “Talking about Teaching” discussions and share some ideas about how to expand these conversations beyond the Department of History. Our Faculty Facilitator, Professor Amy Leonard, will provide insights on fulfilling student needs from the perspective of a college educator and the Department’s Director of Undergraduate Studies. Together, we will discuss ways that both graduate and undergraduate students can best be equipped for life after Georgetown.

In the absence of formal pedagogical training, we believe it is imperative for graduate students to supplement their hands-on experience in the classroom with more substantive discussion on the practice of teaching and learning. We are hoping to use our panel as a forum to discuss our ideas with both graduate students and faculty members in the hope that similar organizations and collaborative spaces dedicated to pedagogy might emerge across campus.

Speakers

Thursday May 23, 2019 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Film Screening Room

2:00pm

(Livestream Attendance) - Talking about Teaching: A Collaborative Approach to Graduate Student Pedagogical Education - 2:00 - 2:30pm
We spend so much time as graduate students thinking, writing, and talking about our research and fields of interests that we sometimes lose sight of the importance of being as effective educators as we are scholars. Despite the fact that most doctoral programs are designed to produce future faculty, much of our pedagogical training is informal and little of it geared toward the likely non-Georgetown students we will one day teach. Realizing this, we decided to create a collaborative space for teaching and learning. “Talking about Teaching” is a space for graduate students to meet monthly to discuss how to support students and implement best practices in the classroom.

The Ignatian ideal of cura personalis naturally lends itself to considering the whole student when we design lessons and policies and establish teaching relationships. In our monthly “Talking about Teaching” meetings, we focus not only on how best to serve Georgetown students as Teaching Assistants and Fellows, but also how to prepare for working in classrooms in universities and colleges beyond the hilltop. The typical U.S. college student looks much different than a Georgetown student — 26 percent are single parents, many are first generation, and those from lower income families are more likely to not complete a degree. We want to leave Georgetown with the pedagogical skills needed to share our subject matter expertise with students of all backgrounds and abilities.

Our panel presentation will provide an overview of the work that we have been doing through our “Talking about Teaching” discussions and share some ideas about how to expand these conversations beyond the Department of History. Our Faculty Facilitator, Professor Amy Leonard, will provide insights on fulfilling student needs from the perspective of a college educator and the Department’s Director of Undergraduate Studies. Together, we will discuss ways that both graduate and undergraduate students can best be equipped for life after Georgetown.

In the absence of formal pedagogical training, we believe it is imperative for graduate students to supplement their hands-on experience in the classroom with more substantive discussion on the practice of teaching and learning. We are hoping to use our panel as a forum to discuss our ideas with both graduate students and faculty members in the hope that similar organizations and collaborative spaces dedicated to pedagogy might emerge across campus.

Speakers

Thursday May 23, 2019 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Zoom

2:00pm

Student Participation with Primary Sources
This will be an interactive session to show some strategies for getting students engaged with primary sources, particularly in a group setting. As a historian, I like to use photographs, letters, and documents of all kinds in class. One key is to move beyond "show and tell" and use a larger collection of items, so that everyone can have an item in front of them to study and analyze. Students also show greater care and concern when presented with real, original materials (rather than copies). Group sources assignments work best when the class a goal in the exercise, usually something like solving a puzzle by using historical artifacts. Students break into small groups and then come together to solve the puzzle. In this presentation/ activity, I will give advice on what has worked for me and what has not. I will argue that thinking like a historian is much like thinking like a detective, and that such exercises as this are essential to history education. While historical source work is the theme of the presentation, the format is easily transferable to other disciplines.

Speakers

Thursday May 23, 2019 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Social Room

2:00pm

Ignatian Pedagogy in the Workplace
What is Ignatian Pedagogy? This resource has been well-established for classroom teaching and faculty-student relationships. This session will explore how the Ignatian Pedagogical Paradigm can support processes and relationships more familiar to co- and extra- curricular work, campus relationships, research partnerships, and professional commitments, such as faculty or unit team meetings. How might this toolkit of Jesuit education support the creation of a more just and humane campus?

Speakers
avatar for Andria Wisler

Andria Wisler

Executive Director, Center for Social Justice Georgetown University


Thursday May 23, 2019 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Herman Room

2:00pm

2:30pm

Cultivating the Virtues of Good Students - 2:30 - 3:00pm
What are the virtues that enable students to flourish as students, and how can we as teachers help our students cultivate those virtues? In this panel presentation, we will discuss our experiences in using virtue-focused pedagogy across multiple courses, and we will explain some methods instructors may use to enable their students to cultivate the virtues of good students. First, we will introduce the idea of a virtue-focused pedagogy and why including virtues of a good student in one's pedagogical paradigm is worthwhile. The virtues of a good student are broad-based: they include intellectual excellences, as well as moral ones; they are cognitive, but also motivational and affective. Because of this, a virtue-focused approach is especially well-suited to the Ignatian ideal of educating the whole person (cura personalis). Second, after introducing the benefits of a virtue-focused approach to pedagogy, we will look at the development inside the classroom of both individual virtues of mind (such as attentiveness and mindfulness) and more social virtues (such as the courage to speak up and open-mindedness to peers). We will present lecture material, in-class activities, and tips on how to model in-class virtues. Third, we will discuss the out-of-class virtues of a good student. These include not only the familiar virtues of hard work, such as grit and perseverance, but also virtues that are perhaps less obvious, such as charitable reading, epistemic cooperation with peers, and the self-awareness to seek help in office hours. Finally, we will discuss how to encourage the virtues that will enable our students to be life-long learners, such as wonder, curiosity, and a willingness to fail. We will present an Ignatian-pedagogy-based virtue journal designed to help students reflect on and intentionally develop the virtues of a life-long learner, as well as discuss how to advise former students on university life and career aspirations. We plan to leave ample time throughout and at the end of the presentation for discussion.

Audience and outcomes note: Instructors (including both graduate and faculty instructors) are the intended audience. Participants will learn about a virtue-focused pedagogical framework and multiple methods for cultivating the virtues of good students. The audience discussion will also allow experienced instructors to contribute their insights into how they help students develop the virtues of being a good student.

Speakers
MW

Molly Wilder

PhD Candidate in Philosophy, Georgetown University


Thursday May 23, 2019 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Film Screening Room